Lighting Fixtures 101: Wall Sconces

Posted by kbanks & filed under lighting designs.

      

Lighting fixtures for the home are now available in any size and for any decor preference and placement in a room. Confused about the terminology for various types of fixtures? We’ve borrowed information from Better Homes and Gardens’ Lighting magazine to help “shed light” on your options!

The beauty of wall lighting is that, along with providing ambient illumination, fixtures may also serve as art and coordinate with decor. There are seven options when choosing wall lighting for the home.

Miniature sconces are downsized wall lighting. These are great for closets, and several fixtures clustered together work in smaller rooms such as laundry.

Swing Arm wall lights are great when there’s no space for a side table or nightstand. The arm of the light moves in, out, down and up.

Outdoor sconces come in a variety of styles to fit any lighting goal or decor.

Sconces work everywhere from hallways to living rooms. The bulb is hidden by a shade and mounted on the wall, with light directed up or down.

Multi-light Sconces are mostly found in bathrooms and feature two or more bulbs.

Picture Lights are designed to illuminate photos, paintings or other wall art. Light is directed off a short stem, with a longer bulb to accent artwork. The fixtures can be hard-wired or worked off a switch.

Track Lighting is great for accenting a bigger stretch of wall or for an unusual light source. The movable track fixtures are typically used on ceilings but can be placed on a wall vertically or horizontally.

Progress Lighting's unique Bingo fixtures provide functional illumination while serving as wall art.

Getting Clear on Lighting with Lance Smith (Part 3)

Posted by kbanks & filed under lighting designs.

      

Our own Lance Smith, Manager of Builder Sales and Marketing, recently contributed to Best Practices Research Alliance’s “Getting Clear on Lighting” series. Check out the informational Q&A in this multi-part blog!

Q: You obviously think a lot about the importance of lighting. What do you tell builders to get them to think more about the role of lighting in their homes?

A: Right now, builders aren’t used to making lighting one of their priorities. They don’t see the value. They’re concerned with framing, HVAC, windows, keeping up with codes. But consumers perceive the value of a better lighting package as higher than its actual cost. Builders are missing out on an effective way to market their homes.

I like to say, “lighting is the jewelry of the home.” For very little money, builders can have a greater perceived value for their homes, and a lighting package doesn’t have to be expensive to be effective—the difference in home cost could be half a percentage point.

Recently, I was in a home that the builder had obviously put a lot of money into in terms of finishes and details. But then I went into the 14×14 walk-in closet, and there’s one fixture with 2 low-watt bulbs in it. It was too dark—you couldn’t tell the difference between navy blue, black and purple and brown. Closets are a woman’s favorite part of the house, aside from the kitchen, and that builder wasn’t capitalizing on that market.

Lighting Fixtures 101: Recessed Lighting

Posted by kbanks & filed under lighting designs.

      

Lighting fixtures for the home are now available in any size and for any decor preference and placement in a room. Confused about the terminology for various types of fixtures? We’ve borrowed information from Better Homes and Gardens’ Lighting magazine to help “shed light” on your options!

Recessed lighting is ideal for providing general, quality illumination while maintaining a clean visual appearance in the ceiling. We have identified seven key terms to know before selected recessed lighting sources for your home:

Round or square refers to the shape of the baffle. Performance is the same, but personal preference will determine shape.

  • New construction or remodel is determined by the type of project. New construction fixtures are attached to ceiling joists by arms. Remodel versions attach to drywall in the ceiling with clips.
  • IC-rated or non-IC housings also depend on the project type. Recessed fixtures that will come in contact with insulation must be IC-rated (insulation contact).
  • Low voltage or line voltage refers to the type of system. Recessed cans with reduced voltage/low voltage systems require a transformer and special dimmer. They are typically smaller in size and use miniature bulbs.
  • Flush, standard or shallow fixtures depend on the depth of the ceiling and your design preferences. Flush fixtures are level with the ceiling, while narrow are shallow.
  • Damp location listed fixtures are specially created for use in rooms that have moisture, such as bathrooms.
  • Fixed or movable fixtures are determined by whether the bulb inside the recessed lighting fixture is stationary or flexible. The ideal type depends on whether you want the flexibility to redirect the light as needed.

Our 6" LED downlight, P8071, is energy efficient and comes in several finish options

Lighting Fixtures 101: Lampshades

Posted by kbanks & filed under lighting designs.

      

Lighting fixtures for the home are now available in any size and for any decor preference and placement in a room. Confused about the terminology for various types of fixtures? We’ve borrowed information from Better Homes and Gardens’ Lighting magazine to help “shed light” on your options!

Lampshades are a decorative option ideal for adding personality and softening illumination to many light fixtures. There are five popular options:

  • Hard lampshades feature a plastic liner covered with a glued-on material, and can be used on any lamp in any decorating style.
  • Soft lampshades are similar to hard shades, but feature a solid-color liner with a more decorative outer shell attached with either thread or tape.
  • Drum, cylinder or oval shades are available in sizes ranging from miniature to oversized. They work well with contemporary or transitional decorating.
  • Floor, empire, bell or coolie shades are typically narrower at the top with varying shapes, and a very flexible in decorating use.
  • Geometric lampshades feature a square, rectangular or another shape, with sides matching. They have a regular width, sometimes with a slight slant from top to bottom, and are a good match for contemporary accents.

What are your favorite lampshade shapes and designs?

The Nisse chandelier features a rich off-white silken fabric oval shade

Lighting Fixtures 101: Ceiling Lighting

Posted by kbanks & filed under lighting designs.

      

Lighting fixtures for the home are now available in any size and for any decor preference and placement in a room. Confused about the terminology for various types of fixtures? We’ve borrowed information from Better Homes and Gardens’ Lighting magazine to “shed light” on your options!

Ceiling fixtures are one of the most popular options for providing general illumination in a room or corridor. There are seven options:

  • Flush mount fixtures closely hug the ceiling, and are a good choice when an understated or slim silhouette is needed.
  • Dropped fixtures include a shade and light source suspended from the ceiling from a short stem. This design becomes a visible element in the room.
  • Chandeliers are suspended from a longer stem or center point, with large central elements and tiers. These fixtures work in virtually any type of space and come in a range of sizes.
  • Recessed cans are installed up in the ceiling. When used in multiples, they are good for generating a lot of light throughout a room.
  • Pendants hang from a longer stem with a single light source, often covered by a shade. A pair or trio of pendants work well over a work space, such as a kitchen island.
  • Ceiling fans offer both air movement and optional overhead light, for use in hot or cold weather. They are perfect in a variety of rooms; newer, smaller fans even work in closets.
  • Track lighting features adjustable mini lights that run along a straight or curved track – great for accenting artwork or hall ways.

How do you incorporate different types of ceiling lighting fixtures to illuminate your home?

Bingo is a statement-making ceiling fixture

Customer Service Appreciation Day at Progress Lighting

Posted by kbanks & filed under Employee, Progress Lighting.

      

This week, Progress Lighting hosted a Customer Service Appreciation Day at the Hubbell Lighting headquarters in Greenville, South Carolina. It is an annual event where we are able to say “thank you” to our hard-working customer service team.

We offered lunch, awards and fun activities for the team to enjoy. Check out all of our photos from the event on our Progress Lighting Facebook page!

Getting Clear on Lighting with Lance Smith (Part 2)

Posted by kbanks & filed under LEDs, lighting designs.

      

Our own Lance Smith, Manager of Builder Sales and Marketing, recently contributed to Best Practices Research Alliance’s “Getting Clear on Lighting” series. Check out the informational Q&A in this multi-part blog!

Q: In your experience, what are the most important challenges builders face in lighting? And what can they do to respond?

A: Being off color. Builders should pay attention to the Kelvin, or temperature, of bulbs. We’ve found that a good range is between 2700-3500, and we try to keep it between there. But I’ve seen builders whose maintenance guys don’t know the difference, and they’re installing lights that are 3000, or 5000 Kelvin. That’s not going to be good lighting to most people. Colors are going to look off.

Here’s a suggestion: Builders should set a standard across their organization for what Kelvin of bulbs their homes should have, and where. For example, they could just do 2700 across the board, make it simple. That would save them a lot of problems.

I also see a lot of builders choose lighting that looks good in the model. But the model doesn’t usually have white walls, and the homes do. Pick lighting that is going to look good in the actual home you build.

Lighting Fixtures 101: Chandeliers

Posted by kbanks & filed under lighting designs.

      

Lighting fixtures for the home are now available in any size and for any decor preference and placement in a room. Confused about the terminology for various types of fixtures? We’ve borrowed information from Better Homes & Gardens’ Lighting magazine to “shed light” on your options!

Chandeliers are dramatic lighting fixtures that add personality and functional illumination to a room. There are five types of chandeliers to choose:

  • Compact/mini styles are great for smaller spaces, such as a laundry room or closet. Newer version come as a small as 9 inches tall.
  • Downlight chandeliers are best suited for rooms with lower ceilings. A shade or other element on the fixture directs light down.
  • Uplight, on the other hand, directs light towards the ceiling. This fixture is ideal for eliminating shadows in large or soaring areas, including two-story height entryways.
  • Candelabra styles holds candle-like lights (and sometimes lampshades) in multiple tiers. These are great for traditionally-designed spaces.
  • Drum chandeliers are a good match for rooms with clean lines. A circular cover shields the light.

Which chandelier styles are ideal for the favorite rooms of your home?

Progress Lighting's Orbitz chandelier features shades that can be directed up or down.

Getting Clear on Lighting with Lance Smith (Part 1)

Posted by kbanks & filed under Homebuilders, LEDs.

      

Our own Lance Smith, Manager of Builder Sales and Marketing, recently contributed to Best Practices Research Alliance’s “Getting Clear on Lighting” series. Check out the informational Q&A in this multi-part blog!

Q: You seem to agree that LEDs are the future, and that they’ll become mainstream faster than many predicted.

A: What we’re seeing in residential is LED technology that commercial has seen for a while now. We’ve reached the performance we need—12 watts for 1000 lumens. But the first question I get from a national builder when we meet is, “Has the price of LEDs come down?” We need to decrease the costs.

LEDs will continue to get cheaper, but because it’s a better technology, there’s a limit to how cheap it can get. Luckily there are other ways to reduce the price. For example, LEDs are so bright now, that we can reduce the number of them in a bulb and get the same effect. Their price will be more in line with fluorescent pricing five years down the road.

One kind of LED we think has special promise is the AC LED. (AC LED works on the alternating current of normal household current rather than requiring additional parts to use direct current.)  Commercial lighting has had this technology for a year. It reduces the cost and size of the LED bulb and gives better performance.

Progress is committed to the growth of LEDs. We’re introducing more LED products in outdoor styles, a new LED flushmount series, and we’re making our award-winning Bingo lighting series in AC LED now.

Lightbulb FAQs

Posted by kbanks & filed under energy efficiency.

      

The lighting industry is changing quickly. New legislation, phaseouts and technologies are affecting the options we have available to illuminate our homes. We share the top five frequently asked questions (and answers) as recently found in Better Homes and Gardens’ Lighting magazine.

Q: I’ve heard that 100-watt bulbs are now banned, and 75-watt and 60-watt bulbs aren’t far behind. What’s the reason?

A: The bulbs themselves are not banned, but the federal government has instituted a staggered set of regulations that requires lightbulbs to meet certain efficiency standards. Traditional incandescent technology – which wastes 90% of the energy it emits as heat – cannot meet those regulations, so manufacturers are developing replacements for those bulbs.

Q: What’s the best replacement for a 100-watt bulb?

A: There are plenty of options that closely match the color and output of incandescents, while trimming utility bills. The traditional 100-watt incandescent bulbs delivers 1,700 lumens of warm-colored light. 72-watt halogen incandescent or 23- or 27-watt CFL bulbs are similar in appearance but last longer and are more efficient.

Q: What are good replacements for other wattages of bulbs?

A: For a 75-watt bulb, look for a 53-watt halogen incandescent. Use a 43-watt halogen incandescent to replace a 60-watt incandescent. For a 40-watt traditional incandescent, use a 29-watt halogen incandescent.

Q: I don’t like the light color of CFL bulbs. What are my options?

A: CFLs have come a long way, and you should be able to find both warm- and cool-colored light now available.

Q: Can I use LEDs in traditional light fixtures that once accepted incandescents?

A: There are LEDs to replace traditional incandescents, but many are still expensive. They pay off with energy savings and can last 25 years. Watch for the cost to continue to decrease as this advanced technology becomes more widely available.