Details behind Kate Rumson’s beautiful kitchen makeover

Details behind Kate Rumson’s beautiful kitchen makeover

Kate-rumson-new-photo.sample2Kate Rumson, the interior design and construction expert behind The Real Houses of Instagram recently finished a truly stunning kitchen remodel featuring Progress Lighting. Whether or not you’re in remodeling stages yourself, or are thinking about a potential kitchen remodel – we’re thrilled to share the entire process and project details that went into making this kitchen.

We sat down with Kate to learn more about her approach to seamlessly incorporating all of her client’s needs into a beautiful kitchen.

Client’s request
My clients asked for a light (but not pure white) kitchen that wouldn’t look too traditional, too modern, too busy or too boring (all their words). They wanted a universally appealing space that would be both functional and beautiful.

The process
When I begin the process of designing a kitchen, I always start with four most important elements: cabinets, backsplash, countertops and lighting.

Cabinets are the foundation. It’s where I start and set the tone for the overall look of the kitchen. I had an idea of the style of cabinets I wanted to work with to achieve the look my client had asked for. I chose off-white cabinets with many practical features expected in today’s kitchens.

The next step was to find the perfect backsplash. I was looking for something unique and neutral at the same time. I looked at about 50 tile samples before finding the one I ended up using. I knew I found my perfect backsplash the second I saw it – the color of the stone part in the mosaic tile was almost the same as the color of the cabinets, giving it that simplistic and calm look I was going for, while the arabesque shape and sparkly antique mirror accents added the right amount of interest and made it look anything but boring.

The next step was to select the perfect countertop to work with the cabinets and backsplash. I knew exactly what I was looking for – something light, simple and practical. I wanted to see texture and interest in the countertop, but in a subtle and understated way. I didn’t want the countertop to take away from the intricate backsplash I chose for this kitchen. I ended up using cream colored quartz: light color with cream undertones, sophisticated texture and a simple and quiet overall look that complemented the rest of the finishes – but didn’t compete with some of the more prominent elements in the space.

Caress fixtures in The Real Houses of Instagram kitchen renovation
To tie it all together and take this kitchen to the next level, I needed to find the perfect lighting. The biggest challenge in this kitchen was its size and low ceilings. When choosing pendant lighting for a kitchen with eight-foot ceilings, proportions are extremely important and every inch matters. I didn’t want the height of the ceiling to limit me from creating that “wow factor” with lighting. I turned to Progress Lighting because I knew that many fixtures in their collections come in a variety of sizes. I wanted to bring a little drama to this kitchen by choosing two pendants that are slightly larger than your typical island pendants. Aesthetically I was looking for something simple and interesting at the same time. Editor’s note: Kate ultimately selected foyer fixtures within Progress Lighting’s Caress collection for this kitchen transformation!

For the breakfast area I wanted a fixture that would work with the island pendant but wouldn’t be too matchy-matchy, another reason Progress Lighting was the perfect choice for this space. Most of their collections offer many different styles so it makes it easy to incorporate multiple fixtures in the same space. Editor’s note: Kate decided on a five-light chandelier within Progress Lighting’s Caress collection to display in the breakfast nook.

My clients and I are absolutely thrilled with the way it all came together. It was also a lot of fun sharing the entire process of this transformation with over a million people on Instagram!

Photography by Chris Veith